<img height="1" width="1" style="display:none" src="https://www.facebook.com/tr?id=1441829102512164&amp;ev=PageView&amp;noscript=1">

Teachstone Blog

How Will President Trump's Budget Blueprint Affect Early Childhood Education?

17 Mar 2017

 

At the end of February, I had the great privilege of attending the annual National Association for the Education of Young Children (NAEYC) Public Policy Forum as part of my state team, the Connecticut Association for the Education of Young Children (CTAEYC). The field was well-represented: teaching staff and administrators, as well as professional development providers and advocates from a non-profit campus-based child care center, a family child care, a non-profit hospital-based child care center, a for-profit child care center, and two training, support, and research centers for early childhood programs in Connecticut.

Topics: Leadership and Policy, In the News Read More

Why CLASS Specialists Love Analogy (and you should, too!)

07 Mar 2017

 

CLASS Specialists are always thinking about the complexity of the CLASS tool as we prepare for our trainings. As a trained CLASS observer, I am comfortable observing and recognizing quality interactions that fit in the tool. But I needed a strategy to convey this information to those who may not be as familiar with the tool.

As it turns out, using an analogy is a perfect way to make the complex relatable, less overwhelming, and more familiar to our participants. 

Topics: Coach Tips, Just for Fun, CLASS FAQs Read More

What's the Deal with Rote Practice?

02 Mar 2017

 

“Tell me and I forget, teach me and I may remember, involve me and I learn.”  - Benjamin Franklin

 

Think back to a time when you were a student in a classroom.

Yes, I know some of us, including myself, don’t want to think back that far, but for the sake of this discussion, let’s try it.

I remember, quite vividly, sitting at desks which were all neatly lined up in rows, with the teacher at the front of the room. I would stare at the back of someone’s head, with very little eye contact. And forget about communicating with my peers because that was a no-no during most of my years of schooling. The teacher would write letters, numbers, or facts on the chalkboard. I was expected to repeat and recite them. This “drill and kill” activity might have then been followed up with a task of copying these same facts onto a piece of paper. Later, I would take them home and memorize them for an upcoming test.

Occasionally my teacher would say, “ok we are going to play a game today.” I would get so excited because something different was going to happen. My teacher would pull out a set of flashcards, and hold up each one as we called out the correct answers. The child with the most flashcards at the end of the game was the “winner.”

This would take place week after week, in each of the subject areas, and we’d be tested on these same facts each Friday. If you, like myself, were really good at memorizing facts, you would ace the tests. You would then get your report card with all of those A’s, and everyone knew you were going to succeed at life because you were a good student. Sound familiar?  

I think it’s safe to say this was probably a pretty common scenario for many of you. You, like many students across the U.S., would work your way through school, memorizing information in each grade level, but were you really learning it?

Topics: Teacher Tips Read More

The Best Recipe to Include Instructional Learning Formats at Mealtime

27 Feb 2017

Serving meals to preschool children can be challenging. The daily schedule can easily get away from you through unexpected interruptions, spending more time than planned on an exciting activity, sick children, or some of the many accidents that occur in busy classrooms. As a result, mealtimes often get pushed to the side as just one of the daily routines necessary to get through the day.

But we should still be thoughtful to include high-quality interactions at mealtimes for many reasons. First, is that with our nation’s high obesity rates, the emphasis on nutrition and healthy choices is growing. Secondly, we know that many families are busy and mealtimes are often sacrificed at home. 

Finding ways to engage children during mealtime as a relaxing and important interaction of each day matters! That’s why I’m here to discuss how you can include the CLASS dimension of Instructional Learning Formats (ILF) while children eat.

So, you might wonder, “How do I do this if I’m already so busy?” Well, I’ve got just the recipe for you.

Topics: Teacher Tips Read More

Tulsa Studies Demonstrate Gains of Early Childhood Education

22 Feb 2017

Research has long examined the different ways in which students gain from early childhood education, but two new studies from Tulsa have shown some new areas of gains in Head Start Programs, as well as school readiness gains being closely predicted by the CLASS tool. While variation between classes and schools continue to be a problem in early childhood education outcomes, CLASS is driving schools towards greater success.

Topics: Research, Leadership and Policy Read More

Highlights and Updates from QRIS

20 Feb 2017

Incremental growth matters!

As anyone who has been to a CLASS training can attest, we are all about incremental growth, resisting the urge to promise a “quick-fix.” But, it can be hard to resist the urge to promise overnight changes, even though many indications point to slow, steady improvement being more likely to lead to lasting change.

Topics: Research, Leadership and Policy, Data Read More

A Glimpse Into Video Diversity at Teachstone

15 Feb 2017

As the Content Asset Manager at Teachstone, I spent most of my time managing our classroom videos. So when I talk to CLASS users in the field, I am frequently asked about the amount of racial, ethnic, and regional diversity in our video collections. When I respond, I usually begin by explaining that creating products that reflect the diversity of classrooms and communities across the country is a core value for Teachstone. 

Topics: Research, Data, Products and Trainings Read More

The 5 Questions that Feedback Strategies Training Will Help You Answer

13 Feb 2017

 

 

Being an instructional coach or mentor is difficult. Sometimes it may feel like you don't have any support—especially when it comes to providing effective feedback to the teachers you work with. Have you, as a coach, ever asked yourself any of the following questions?

Topics: Coach Tips, Products and Trainings Read More

Is the Instructional Support Domain boring?

09 Feb 2017

Does this scenario sound familiar to you?

You're in a coaching session trying to help your teacher understand how to be more intentional in her interactions with children in the dimension of Concept Development. When you start to explain what analysis and reasoning look like, she looks at you with that quizzical look in her eye. You suggest, “Let’s look at the Dimension Guide on page 19 and let’s read these informational paragraphs.” 

Topics: Coach Tips, Products and Trainings Read More

How Does Roughhousing Impact Behavior Management Scores?

01 Feb 2017

Dear Master Coders,

I recently heard about risk competency and big body play at a local teaching conference. I have spent time considering this in relation to our Head Start program. One of the questions I have been asking myself is how some play that might be considered "roughhousing" will impact CLASS scores in Behavior Management. Behaviors that typically appear aggressive (pushing, hitting, building a "sword" out of markers and then using it to inadvertently hit another child) lower the score in this dimension. Do I change the way I view this interaction in terms of CLASS? Does this put me at risk for no longer being reliable? What advice do you have regarding this? 

Thanks!

Topics: Reliability & Certification, Pre-K Read More

Subscribe by RSS

Blog Feed